Staff Meetings

TIMES STAFF MEETINGS

“Knowing is not Enough We must Apply; Willing is Not Enough; We Must Do”


Meetings, if done properly, are the most effective way of making decisions and motivating staff. In effective meetings, participants can contribute and share their thoughts and as a result, will feel more engaged with your school. If the discussion is properly documented in meeting minutes and a comprehensive tasks list, our meetings will lead to tangible results.

A few minutes after students were dismissed, staff members began to arrive at the meeting. After allowing a few minutes for staff to get refreshments and engage in informal conversation,  A.K.Mahalakshmi  M.S.C., M.Phil.,M.B.A., Principal will  start the meeting by quickly reviewing the agenda.

Next, she will ask  staff members to engage in what she called a “staff building” activity; then to engage in “team building” activities at each table; and finally to engage in a combination of small- and large-group activities related to the use of technology in achieving math and reading goals. Everyone appeared to be actively listening and passionately sharing ideas while remaining focused on the topic under discussion.

Times School Faculty Meetings

Either prior to or at the beginning of the school year,

We Communicate the purpose of faculty meetings.

We Collaborate with staff on developing norms for expected behavior.

We Create faculty “base teams.”

We Collaborate with staff on developing norms for expected behavior.

 Communicating the Purpose of Faculty Meetings

Meetings shouldn’t simply serve as  transmitting information to staff; this should be done via Messages , weekly bulletin, or e-mail prior to each meeting. Instead, TIMES meetings will fulfill the following three purposes:

To build relationships among staff.

To focus on professional development.

To solve problems and make decisions.

Collaborating with Staff on Developing Norms for Expected Behavior

We Discuss the value of having a set of basic agreements for faculty meetings. After reviewing a sample of possible agreements, have staff members add more to the list. Continue adding possible agreements until nobody can think of any more. Sample agreements could include the following:

We will start and end meetings on time.

We will actively listen to each other’s ideas and opinions.

We will make important decisions through consensus.

We will work from a staff-developed agenda that is distributed 24 hours prior to the staff meeting.

We will remain focused on the topic or task.

       Times staff members divide a piece of paper into two columns. Inform staff members that they each have 100 points, which they must divide among all the agreements listed. (The more points, the more valuable the agreement.) Once staff members have all completed the task individually, ask them to share their scores in groups of three or four and complete the activity once more. When everyone is finished, collect and tally the second set of scores. The top three to five choices will then constitute the group’s agreements for faculty meetings.

We will start and end meetings on time.

We will actively listen to each other’s ideas and opinions.

We will make important decisions through consensus.

We will work from a staff-developed agenda that is distributed 24 hours prior to the staff meeting.

We will remain focused on the topic or task.

We Create faculty “base teams.”

We Created Faculty “Base Teams”

Base teams are long-term, heterogeneous groups to which staff members are assigned. The major purposes of these base groups are as follows:

To involve all staff members at the beginning and ending of each meeting

To personalize meetings

To provide a schoolwide focus to meetings

To provide peer support for and celebration of staff efforts

To increase the likelihood that all staff members will actively contribute to the meeting

Base teams should have between two and five staff members, with four being optimal because it allows for pair work. You can assign members at random, or choose to include a mix of grades, subject areas, or experience levels on each team. Either way, teams should be relatively heterogeneous and represent more than one grade level or subject area.

Faculty Meeting Roles

Any group will function more effectively if members know each other’s responsibilities. The following are the three most common roles at faculty meetings:

The facilitator    is usually (but not always) the principal. He or she leads the meeting and promotes the participation of all members through gate keeping and consensus seeking.

The recorder     writes down details of the meeting, such as the people present and the agenda items, along with any relevant information discussed. He or she should also produce written minutes of the meeting and distribute them to all staff members within 48 hours.

The timekeeper    watches the clock and warns fellow members when the designated time for each agenda item is over.


 


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